Another display of Pakistan Army’s inhumanity! Indian pilot under custody, Pakistan violates Geneva convention; know how..!

With escalating tension between India and Pakistan, the Indian Air Force today retaliated as the Pakistani Air Force tried to intrude in the Indian space with its F-16 jet.

The Pakistan Army claimed they arrested two Indian pilots on which the Ministry of External Affairs confirmed they ‘have lost one MiG 21 and its pilot’. With Pakistan claiming the custody of the Indian pilot, following an aerial encounter with the Indian Air Force over the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir today, there were calls to treat him humanely and in accordance to the Geneva Conventions.

This came up after a video was leaked on social media showing the heinous and inhuman behaviour of Pakistani Army treating the Indian Pilot Wing Commander Abhinandan. Pakistan has violated the conventions by releasing a purported video showing the Indian pilot tied up and bloodied on social media.

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According to the Geneva Convention, the law states: “Their detention is not a form of punishment, but only aims to prevent further participation in the conflict. They must be released and repatriated without delay after the end of hostilities. The detaining power may prosecute them for possible war crimes, but not for acts of violence that are lawful under the International Humanitarian Law (IHL).

The Indian government has said an Indian pilot is “missing in action” after an Air Force aircraft shot down a Pakistani jet that was targeting military installations in India. It said it was “ascertaining facts” on Pakistan’s claim that they had him in their custody.

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The Geneva Convention was a series of international diplomatic meetings that framed international laws for the humane treatment of wounded or captured military personnel during war-time. The norm, which was first published in 1929, refined in the 1949 meet and an Additional Protocol I was added in 1977. The Additional Protocol provides extensive protection for civilian internees during international armed conflicts. Civilian internees are those detained by a war party for security reasons.

According to the norms, prisoners of war are not allowed to be prosecuted for taking a direct part in hostilities. The law asserts that the POW must be treated humanely in all circumstances and are to be protected against any act of violence, as well as against intimidation, insults and public curiosity.

COURTESY:- NEWS BHARATI

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